Contact Us

Have questions?  Use this form to contact us.

We will respond to you as soon as possible.

Thank You,

Gary Detonnancourt


Harrisville, RI 02830
United States

More Than A Snapshot provides online photography education.

Booth Bay Harbor 2013-5410-color enhanced.jpg

Blog

This is the blog for More Than A Snapshot's Online Photography Classes.  In these blog posts I will give photography tips, tutorials, and show images.

Filtering by Tag: Adobe

How to Create a Slideshow with Photoshop CC

Gary Detonnancourt

Slideshows can easily be created with Adobe Lightroom, however, you can have more options and media choices if you make your slideshows with Photoshop.  I made this set of tutorials to show you how you can use Adobe Photoshop CC to make simple slideshows with just still images or mixed media slideshows that can include animation, video and text.

How to Make a Slideshow in Photoshop CC

Here are some of the important steps in the process along with screenshots.

  • Export Images from Lightroom at 1920 x 1080
  • Photoshop:  Click File>Open
  • Open one image
  • Click Window>Timeline
  • Click create video timeline
  • Click add Media to add more images
  • Drag images around to re-order them
  • Drag the edge of images to change the length of time they will be displayed
  • Add transitions between images
  • Add animations to individual images
  • Add a black background for images that may not be 1920 x 1080
  • Add Sound and adjust sound options
  • Click the hamburger menu on the right side of the timeline > Render video (see video #2 for more information.)

Basic Slideshow with still images only.  Music from Bensound

 
Enhancing a slideshow with video and text.
 

Adirondacks slideshow with Text and Video.  Music from Bensound

 

Three Ways to Launch the Nik Plugins

Gary Detonnancourt

If you like this video and you're interested in learning more about the Nik Collection, click here to join my free course.  It's still under development and won't be free forever, so get in while you can.  Your input could even help make this my greatest course.

 

How to Install the Google Nik Collection in Lightroom

Gary Detonnancourt

Click here to download the free Google Nik Collection.  Stay tuned for more videos on how to use the collection and for a future class on the whole collection.

If you like this video and you're interested in learning more about the Nik Collection, click here to join my free course.  It's still under development and won't be free forever, so get in while you can.  Your input could even help make this my greatest course.

 
 

How to Use the Content Aware Move Tool in Photoshop CC

Gary Detonnancourt

How to Use the Content Aware Move Tool in Photoshop CC 

New Tool: Boundry Warp in Lightroom CC / Photoshop CC

Gary Detonnancourt

New Tool: Boundry Warp in Lightroom CC / Photoshop CC

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Lightroom CC
29.99 97.00

This course will help you to understand how to use Lightroom for all of your image editing needs. I cover everything from organizing your images to printing to slideshows. Every module is covered. This course is also frequently updated with the latest information and techniques. The course covers Lightroom versions 4, 5, and 6/CC.

This course is almost 100% video lessons with some supporting notes and references. The course has more than 46 lessons and I'm constantly adding new lessons. You will have access to me through Udemy's discussion tab for answering all of your questions and checking out your progress with your image editing.

You should take this course if you are new to using Lightroom or if you are experienced and just need to learn more details about how the program works. This course does start at the beginning but then goes to an advanced level.

Add To Cart

It's Finally Safe to Upgrade to Lightroom 2015 6.3

Gary Detonnancourt

In a recent Lightroom update, Adobe decided to make major changes to the import process, in order to appeal to a more consumer level user.  However, the current Lightroom users were outraged with the performance problems, the removal of important features, and the crashing of Apple computers.  Luckily Adobe listened to their customers and created an update called 1015.3 or 6.3 which returned the import process back to normal.  It's now safe to update your Lightroom again.  This update seems to be stable, but only time will tell since it just came out. Check out the list below to see what else is in this update.

New Camera Support

Lightroom will now import files from the following new cameras: Canon EOS M10, Canon PowerShot G5 X, Canon PowerShot G9 X, Fujifilm X-T1 IR, Leica SL (Typ 601), Sony RX1R II (DSC-RX1RM2). Click here for a list of all cameras supported in Lightroom 6 (and other Lightroom versions. The title says Camera Raw, but the righthand column shows Lightroom support.)

New Tethering Support

Lightroom will now allow you to shoot tethered with the following additional cameras: Canon EOS 5DS, Canon EOS 5DS R, Canon EOS T6i / 750D, Canon EOS T6s / 760D. With your camera connected to your computer via USB, you can automatically import photos into Lightroom as you shoot. Click here for a list of all cameras supported for tethered capture.

Bug Fixes

Here is a list of fixed bugs, from Adobe:

Fixed several instability, functionality and performance issues introduced in Lightroom CC 2015.2.x/6.2.x.
Fixed several bugs related to Panorama Merge.

Fixed bugs that:

  • caused edits made and saved in Photoshop or 3rd party plug-ins to not appear in the Develop module.
  • caused user default for Chromatic Aberration Correction to not be honored after new Import option was removed.
  • prevented rotated photos from showing as rotated when in Full Screen view.
  • caused a performance slowdown when creating Standard sized previews on high resolution monitors.
  • caused image previews to be incorrectly displayed as completely black after import if “Auto Tone” is on in preferences.
  • caused crash when using the Radial or Graduated Filter.
  • caused Palette, a 3rd party hardware device, to stop working with Lightroom.
  • caused the Map module to appear pixelated and photos to be  dropped in the wrong place when using hi-dpi monitors on Windows.
  • prevented you from exiting Full Screen view while using the Spot Healing Tool.
  • caused the Flickr Publish Service to improperly publish multi-word keywords.

New Lens Profiles

MountName

AppleiPhone 6s back camera 4.15mm f/2.2

AppleiPhone 6s front camera 2.65mm f/2.2

AppleiPhone 6s Plus back camera 4.15mm f/2.2

AppleiPhone 6s Plus front camera 2.65mm f/2.2

Canon EFCanon EF 35mm f/1.4L II USM

Canon EFCanon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II USM

Canon EFCanon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II USM +1.4x

Canon EFCanon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II USM +2.0x

Canon EFCanon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM

Canon EFCanon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM +1.4x

Canon EFCanon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM +2.0x

Canon EFCanon EF 400mm f/4 DO IS II USM +1.4x

Canon EFCanon EF 400mm f/4 DO IS II USM +2.0x

Canon EFCanon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM

Canon EFCanon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM +1.4x

Canon EFCanon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM +2.0x

Canon EFCanon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM

Canon EFCanon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM +1.4x

Canon EFCanon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM +2.0x

Canon EFCanon MP-E 65mm f/2.8 1-5x Macro Photo

Canon EFSIGMA 20mm F1.4 DG HSM A015

Canon EFZeiss Milvus 1.4/50 ZE

Canon EFZeiss Milvus 1.4/85 ZE

Canon EFZeiss Milvus 2/35 ZE

Canon EFZeiss Milvus 2/50M ZE

Canon EFZeiss Milvus 2/100M ZE

Canon EFZeiss Milvus 2.8/21 ZE

Canon EFZeiss Otus 1.4/28 ZE

Canon EF-MCanon EF-M 15-45mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM

DJIZENMUSE X3 HG310 (RAW + JPEG)

DXODxO ONE

Leica MVoigtlander VM 35mm f/1.7 Ultron

Nikon FNikon AF NIKKOR 24-85mm f/2.8-4D IF

Nikon FSIGMA 20mm F1.4 DG HSM A015

Nikon FZeiss Milvus 1.4/50 ZF.2

Nikon FZeiss Milvus 1.4/85 ZF.2

Nikon FZeiss Milvus 2/35 ZF.2

Nikon FZeiss Milvus 2/50M ZF.2

Nikon FZeiss Milvus 2/100M ZF.2

Nikon FZeiss Milvus 2.8/21 ZF.2

Nikon FZeiss Otus 1.4/28 ZF.2

PENTAXAsahi PENTAX Super-Takumar 28mm f/3.5 M42

PENTAXAsahi PENTAX Super-Takumar 50mm f/1.4 M42

PENTAXSIGMA 18-300mm F3.5-6.3 DC MACRO OS HSM C014

SONY ASIGMA 18-300mm F3.5-6.3 DC MACRO OS HSM C014

SONYSony DSC-RX1RM2

SONY FEZeiss Loxia 2.8/21

SIGMASIGMA 20mm F1.4 DG HSM A015

Photoshop Blend Modes

Gary Detonnancourt

Photoshop Blend Modes

by A. Cemal Ekin

 

Introduction

Few users wander into the domain of “blend modes” in Photoshop although it is out there in plain sight. Any time a new layer is added its blend mode can be changed to affect a subtle or drastic change in the way it interacts with the layers below. One of the reasons for users avoiding the blend modes is the terminology associated with the tool. When you click on the blend modes drop-down menu in the layers palette, a whole bunch of options appear with little hint as to what they may do to the image. So, let us start with a general explanation of the blend mode groups and then use a few of them to better understand their uses.

Blend mode groups

In addition to the always visible “Normal” there are quite a few other blend modes. They are implicitly grouped according to their general effects. I have identified the general function of each group with the added group labels. Although Adobe uses more technical terms for them, this set of group labels is used quite often because they are more descriptive of the blend functions. For instance, the first group will serve to darken the image when possible but never lighten it. Likewise, the second group blend modes will always lighten the image but never darken it. Some blend modes are far more useful in photography and are more frequently used. Although others may have their uses in some instances, many remain on the sidelines for most users. I find the following blend modes quite useful: Multiply, Screen, Overlay, Soft Light, Color, Saturation, Luminosity. In this post, I will share with you some uses of the frequently used blend modes. By the way, in addition to the layer blend modes, Photoshop also offers Brush blend modes, Apply Image, and Calculation blend modes. We will focus only on the layer blend modes this time.

Terminology

If you read articles, books on blend modes you will come across “Source, Blend, and Result” terms quite often. Each blend mode is a mathematical function that uses the pixel level interaction between the image before a new layer is added and the new layer itself. The layer whose blend mode is under consideration is called the source, the applied blend mode is called the blend, and how the image looks after that is called the result. How the mathematical functions work is not in the scope of this post. If you are interested you can search the Internet to find the mathematical expressions and extensive writing on each function. However, in order to use the blend modes you do not need to know the underlying equation, just what the blend mode does to your image.

Quick image fixes

You can use the blend modes to quickly fix the exposure and contrast of underexposed, overexposed, and flat images. Here is how to go about it. Keep in mind that the effects of the blend mode adjustments can be localized by using layer masks and their effect can be reduced by lowering the layer opacity.

Fix underexposed image

1.       Open the image in Photoshop

2.       Create a duplicate layer of the background

3.       Change the blend mode of the new layer to “Screen”

4.       Adjust layer opacity to reduce the blend mode result if necessary

In essence, you are using the image to repair itself. Depending on the luminance values at each pixel, they will be lightened. This may fix the underexposure problem and the new layer can be duplicated to add more of the same.

Fix overexposed image

1.       Open the image in Photoshop

2.       Create a duplicate layer of the background

3.       Change the blend mode of the new layer to “Multiply”

4.       Adjust layer opacity to reduce the blend mode result if necessary

Again, depending on the luminance values at each pixel they will be proportionately darkened and this layer can be duplicated with its blend mode intact to darken the image a little more.

Fix flat images

1.       Open the image in Photoshop

2.       Create a duplicate layer of the background

3.       Change the blend mode of the new layer to “Overlay”

4.       Adjust layer opacity to reduce the blend mode result if necessary

The overlay blend mode has no impact on middle gray tones; any tonal value lighter than middle gray is proportionately lightened, and any value darker than the mid tone will be proportionately darkened. The result is an image where lights are lighter and darks are darker, in other words, it has more contrast.

Split sharpening

When using Unsharp Mask Sharpening, the white halos around the sharpened edges may be hard to control at times. Of course, one can use a layer mask and hide the halos but that will also hide the darkened edges as well. One simple solution is to do the sharpening in two separate layers instead of one. One layer will control the lightened edges and the other, darkened. Here is how we can go about it.

1.       Create a merged layer on top of all the layers in the image (Shift-Ctrl-Alt-E), change the name to “Lighten” and change the blend mode to “Lighten” as well

2.       Duplicate this layer (Ctrl-J), change the name to “Darken” and change the blend mode to “Darken”

3.       Target the “Darken” layer, and apply your unsharp mask. This can be a bit more aggressive than the light edges in the next step since darkened edges do not pop out of the image like the lightened edges in the form of white halos. Consider the output device and apply sharpening while keeping in mind that this is only one-half of the sharpening.

4.       Now, target the lighten layer and apply unsharp mask. Here you may consider using a smaller radius, lower amount, and higher threshold but don’t be too shy. While applying this sharpening you will start seeing the full sharpening effect combined with the darkened edges

5.       If there are halos that are too visible, add a layer mask and mask the offending halo areas. This will only affect the lightened edges and only the areas you are masking.

There are variants of this method with greater flexibility but for an introductory post on layer blend modes, this should provide a good taste of what this powerful tool can do. We have only scratched the surface of layer blend modes. Keep thinking what else you can do with these tools and don’t forget to experiment, just for the heck of it. You can even change the blend modes of adjustment layers like curves, levels, etc. to control how the adjustment interacts with the layers below. In short, layer blend modes lets you push Photoshop to do the heavy lifting when editing your photographs.

Now, get the blender out!

A. Cemal Ekin, PhD

Kept Light Photography
http://www.keptlight.com

I retired from Providence College in 2012 as Professor Emeritus. Teaching has been a great experience, affected my photography, and how I share what I know with others. That, in turn, has helped me to learn more about photography, my photography, the art of photography.

I am an interested, curious observer, fully self-taught photographer through practice, experimentation, failures, reading and looking at photographs. I write about photography to sharpen my understanding of it. You can see my work, read my articles on a wide range of photography topics, and learn more about my photographic philosophy on my Web site.